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2014 Engaged Faculty Fellows

Our Faculty Programs seek to support those leading or involved with engagement initiatives. Our programming provides spaces to learn how engaged research or service-learning courses can work for you, connect with other like-minded individuals, discover best methods, develop collaborations and new ideas, and explore the resources available. Click name to jump to individual profile.

SHERENE BAUGHER | DEBRA CASTILLO | JOSH CERRA | ELLA DIAZ | ANGELA GONZALEZ | PETER HOBBS | CHRISTINE LEUENBERGER | KATHRYN S. MARCH
| HEIDI MOUILLESSEAUZ-KUNZMAN | ANANDA SUAREZ | RANA ZADEH

 


 

Sherene Baugher

FIELD OF WORK:

Professor, Landscape Architecture

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca, NY

THE STORY:

Sherene wants to expand her current service-learning course, Designing Archaeological Exhibits into a year-long program with a course in the Fall (Part I) and a follow-up course in the Spring (Part II). The exhibits course was originally designed as an introduction to museum exhibit design (to lay the method and theory ground work) and then to have students engage with community members on an actual design for a real exhibit. The current course does have community involvement; unfortunately, within the framework of one semester, the students only have time to come up with preliminary designs. Sherene wants the students to do a design and build course, not just to leave the community with designs that the community could pay someone to implement in the future. The second part (the Spring semester) is where the students work most closely with community members in various redesigns of the exhibit and where the students truly experience the full impact and understanding of community partnerships.

THE PERSON:

Sherene has been involved in service-learning courses and community outreach work since 1993.

As the first City Archeologist for New York City (1980-1990), I learned the importance of linking research and outreach, and developed an understanding of law, government and the role we can play in changing public policy. I am academic archaeologist who is also concerned about civic engagment. Because of this background I am committed to incorporating service-learning into my teaching. I have been a leader in American urban archaeology and since coming to Cornell I had also raised the professional awareness of farmstead archaeology and landscape archaeology. I have helped raise the profile of American landscape archaeology within the Landscape Architecture profession. I work with planners, preservationists, and Native Americans to excavate and preserve endangered American Indian, colonial, and 19th-century archaeological sites.


Debra Castillo

FIELD OF WORK:

Emerson Hinchliff Professor of Hispanic Studies, Professor of Comparative Literature

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Tompkins County, especially downtown Ithaca

THE STORY:

The goal of this project was to share Latin American and U.S. Latino/a culture with community members of all ages through educational artistic activities. Debra is building on past successful collaborations reaching back to the mid 1990s, as she adds new programs to meet community member needs and student interests. These programs include collaboration with CULTURA! on our popular cuentacuentos (storyteller), antojitos (food), and buen vivir (living well) series; along with new programming initiatives like the year-long filmmaking workshop, “Bridging Stories” involving communities in Ithaca and Chile, which Debra is doing in collaboration with La Poderosa Media Project. She also has organized events for poetry month in April, and (along with the Tellez family restaurant and other community partners) the annual 5 de mayo (Battle of Puebla) celebration. Debra has also participated in the important needs assessment project, El pueblo, commissioned by the Latino Civic Association, and spearheaded by Carolina Osorio Gil.

“When I grow up I want to be a Latino.”—from a young participant in one of the programs.

THE PERSON:

Debra Castillo is Emerson Hinchliff Chair of Hispanic Studies and Professor of Comparative Literature at Cornell University, and former director of the Latin American Studies Program (two separate terms) at that university. She is the author, co-author, translator, or editor of a dozen books and over 100 scholarly articles. She specializes in contemporary narrative from the Spanish-speaking world (including the United States), gender studies, and cultural theory.  Her most recent books include Re-dreaming America: Toward a Bilingual Understanding of American Literature (SUNY, 2004) and the co-edited volumes Cartographies of Affect: Across Borders in South Asia and the Americas (Kolkata 2011), Hybrid Storyspaces (Minnesota 2012), Mexican Public Intellectuals (Palgrave, 2013) and Despite all Adversities: Spanish American Queer Cinema Latin America (SUNY, 2014).

Debra is frequently called on nationally and internationally for conference keynote addresses, invited lectures, and distinguished lecturer appointments in the US, Canada, Europe, Latin America (Mexico, Argentina, Puerto Rico, Perú, Costa Rica, Chile), India, and Taiwan.

She is also the holder of a Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellowship, which is Cornell University’s highest teaching award, and is granted for excellence in undergraduate teaching.  Perhaps the course with which she has been most identified is “Hispanic Theater Production.”  She taught this course, except when on leave, for the past 20 years, and coordinates summer productions on a volunteer basis. Graduate and undergraduate students, as well as some community members participate. Under the troupe name “Teatrotaller,” three times a year the group chooses a play from a Spanish, Latin American, or US Latino/a writer in Spanish or Spanglish and brings it to full production (generally presented in August/September, November, and April). The group has achieved an international reputation for excellence, and has accepted invitations to present their plays in various regional universities (Tufts, Penn State, Barnard, Syracuse) as well as in festivals in Mexico, Canada, Israel, Ecuador, Romania and Belgium.

Website: debracastillo.com

THE STRATEGY:

  • The main vehicle for this collaboration  from the student perspective is the course, Cultures and Communities – LSP 2300/4300, now being offered every semester beginning in Spring 2014.
  • Conceived as a service-learning course, the centerpiece here is targeted, engaged research and arts work with Latino/a culture-related organizations in Tompkins County like Cultura!, No más lágrimas, and La Poderosa.
  • The core idea is that students will learn while participating in meaningful activities that will enhance arts and culture partnerships in our local community

LEARN MORE:

Faculty Profile: complit.arts.cornell.edu/faculty/castillo.html


 

Josh Cerra

FIELD OF WORK:

Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca, NY

THE STORY:

YardWorks is a community engagement effort associated with a design studio Josh teaches in the Landscape Architecture Department. During a series of meetings, site investigations, and design processes, YardWorks works directly with neighborhood communities to assist them in developing a vision and goals for enhancing the overall urban ecological condition of their neighborhood. YardWorks then generates habitat-friendly design solutions for the properties of each of the participants, consistent with these community goals and the needs of individual landowners. This kind of voluntary, cooperative stewardship effort provides a unique opportunity to be strategic about improving urban ecological conditions at the neighborhood-scale, in locations that are typically divided into many individual, privately-owned parcels.

This project is conducted in partnership with the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s YardMap program and Cornell Cooperative Extensions, and is funded by a Smith-Lever grant. Generally, there are three possible outcomes to this initiative: a) engaged learning where students work directly with neighborhood groups and individual “clients” as part of a multi-scale, urban ecological analysis and design process; b) potential community-building around a common goal via engagement between and among community members; c) development of strategies and methodologies for neighborhood-level working with local CCE county offices as partners, and also seek to link participants to related CCE programs and technical implementation assistance over the long term. The Faculty Fellowship allows Joshua to access a community of peers to help identify and navigate areas for improvement he has encountered during his first engagement effort.

THE PERSON:

Josh Cerra, with a background in biology and landscape architecture, has practiced as an environmental designer and ecologist for over 18 years. His work addresses relationships between urban ecosystems and site development processes within a broad range of habitat and development types.  He has worked on interdisciplinary projects in urban ecological design, sustainable development, stormwater systems planning, species-specific habitat planning, and ecological restoration.

THE STRATEGY:

  • Seek new strategies, methods and tools for a) evaluating student learning via direct engagement with the community, and b) minimizing the “engagement gap” between students, teams, and community members when the physical distance between them is significant, for example by mixing face-to-face community workshops and individual meetings with other engagement opportunities using interactive communication technologies.


Ella Diaz

FIELD OF WORK:

Assistant Professor, English and Latino/a Studies

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca, NY and East Harlem

THE STORY:

As a 2014 Faculty Fellow, Ella worked with assistant Ananda Cohen Suarez of the History of Art in planning their Fall 2014 course, “Visualizing el Barrio: Interpreting and Documenting East Harlem’s Mural Tradition.”

Visualizing El Barrio immerses students in a semester-long contemplation and class project that integrates artistic praxis with art history and literary studies to document the historical murals of East Harlem, otherwise known as Spanish Harlem or “El Barrio.” Essential to the educational experience of the course will be the community partners that Diaz and Cohen Suarez will bring into the classroom and project. Through student research and documentation, “Visualizing El Barrio” participated in the preservation of East Harlem’s historical murals, culminating in a celebration of the artwork with a student-curated exhibit of photographs and presentations at Rockefeller Hall in December 2014.

Diaz and Cohen Suarez have turned to us to help effectively plan and implement a course that not only immerses students in experiential learning of public history and alternative epistemologies; but also one that benefits the community they seek to engage students in–the people and artists of East Harlem. The fellowship helped Diaz and Cohen Suarez make better partners with communities of local residents, artists, and students.

“Centuries of neglect of ethnic history have generated a tide of protest–where are the Native Americans, African American, Latino, and Asian American landmarks?” — Dolores Hayden, “The Power of Place,” 1997.

THE PERSON:

Ella Maria Diaz is an assistant professor of English and Latino/a Studies at Cornell University. She was a lecturer at the San Francisco Art Institute from 2006 until 2012. Her dissertation, “Flying Under the Radar with The Royal Chicano Air Force: The Ongoing Politics of Space and Ethnic Identity” won the College of William and Mary’s Distinguished Dissertation Award in 2010. Ella has published through U.C. Santa Barbara’s Imaginarte e-publications, Atzlán: The Journal of Chicano Studies, and in the Chicana/Latina Studies: The Journel of Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social.

Diaz designed and taught “Telling to Live: Critical Examinations of Testimonio” (Fall 2013) in which she worked with Museo Eduardo Carillo on an exhibition of vanguard Chicana artist, Lorraine García-Nakata, entitled Navigating By Hand: Lorraine García-Nakata (October 2013 – January 2014).  Thinking with engaged learning concepts, Ella implemented a student component that was unprecedented for the Museo and her English department. Making the case that García-Nakata visualizes her story as a collective experience, testifying to the power of the everyday life, Ella’s students contributed to the exhibition through published, online essays that analyze García-Nakata’s artworks as testimonios.

THE STRATEGY:

  • For Fall 2014 and the course, “Visualizing El Barrio,” Diaz and Cohen Suarez hoped to foreground effective and mutually beneficial relationships with community partners and their students to realize a photographic and narrative exhibit that has the potential for digital archiving.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE:

The possibilites for the course are endless and through the Engaged Cornell team, and she hopes to learn new methods for building a shared practice for inclusive learning that she can draw on in other courses.

Examples in Action:

http://www.museoeduardocarrillo.org/news/cornell-students-respond/

http://www.sfgate.com/art/article/If-Gender-Is-a-Kind-of-Doing-exhibition-4424876.php

http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/05/diazs-study-art-collective-journeys-chicanoa-culture


Angela Gonzales

FIELD OF WORK:

Associate Professor, Development Sociology

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Hopi Reservation in northern Arizona

THE STORY:

With our support, Angela partnered with a community-based organization on the Hopi Reservation to develop four service-learning projects as part of DSOC 4700, a new senior capstone course for students majoring in Development Sociology. In addition to wanting to provide students an opportunity to synthesize—and bring to bear—the theoretical knowledge, research skills, and intellectual interests they have acquired as students in major, Angela wanted students to consider issues of social justice, not as academic abstractions but as ongoing struggles that daily touch the lives of community partners and the lives of every citizen. Unlike most traditional service-learning courses where students work on projects in the local community, Angela used WebEx, Cornell’s free web conferencing program, to enable students to engage in real-time, virtual “face-to-face” collaboration with partner organizations on the Hopi Reservation.

The projects were developed in collaboration with three partner organizations, the Natwani Coalition, an affiliation of Hopi organizations and individuals dedicated to preserving Hopi farming traditions, strengthening the local Hopi food system and developing innovative sustainable strategies to promote wellness, the Hopi Special Diabetes Program, a local diabetes prevention program funded by the Indian Health Services Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention Programs, and the Hopi Education Endowment fund, a non-profit organization supporting the educational goals and aspirations of tribal members. Working in teams of 3-5, students developed survey instruments and methodologies to assess Hopi opinions about educational priorities, created nutritional policies for Hopi schools, and developed outreach materials to help educate the Hopi community about GMO seeds.

“The conditions that students might find in underdeveloped countries can be found on many Indian reservations in the United States. . . I wanted to find a way to support community organizations in looking into problems or issues that limited resources and manpower prevent from addressing.”

THE PERSON:

Angela Gonzales’ research focuses on understanding and addressing disparities in the prevention, detection, treatment, and burden of cancer and cancer-related health conditions among American Indians.  From 2006-2007, Angela was a fellow in the NIH-funded Native Investigator Development Program at the Native Elder Research Center at the University of Colorado, Denver. Her current research projects include a 5-year NCI-funded study, Enhancing Cervical Cancer Prevention Strategies among Hopi Women and Adolescents. In partnership with the Hopi Tribe, the aims of this two-part community-based project are to examine the presence of high-risk HPV types in American Indian women and identify factors associated with parental acceptability of the HPV vaccination among adolescents 9-12 years of age.

Angela is an enrolled citizen of the Hopi Tribe from the village of Shungopavi. She holds a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California at Riverside, M.A. in Education Policy and Management from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, PhD in Sociology from Harvard University.

Faculty Profile: devsoc.cals.cornell.edu/people/angela-gonzales

THE STRATEGY:

  • Established partnerships with community-based organizations on the Hopi Reservation.
  • Worked with community partners to design community service learning projects as part of DSOC 4700, a new senior capstone course in the Department of Development Sociology
  • Worked with the Academic Technology Center (ATC) to integrate WebEx, Cornell’s free web-conferencing program, into the course to overcome geographical distance by enabling students to engage with community partners in live, face-to-face interaction.
  • Invited representatives from partner organization to Ithaca to meet with students

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE:

Based on her experience in DSOC 4700, Angela has become a “true believer” of the value of service-learning to everyone involved: students, faculty, and community partners.  She looks forward to exploring the integration of service-learning into other courses in Development Sociology.

 “I look forward to continuing to cultivate a relationship of trust and reciprocity that is mutually beneficial to partner organizations and students in DSOC 4700.  Doing so will help students bridge theory with practice, deepen their civic and academic learning, while providing partner organizations with a talented pool of students to help them develop programs and advance projects that limited resources and manpower might not otherwise make possible.”

LEARN MORE:

Angela Bikes 4 Hopi, fundraising bike ride blog in support of the Hopi Cancer Support service.

news.cornell.edu/stories/2014/03/course-connects-students-hop…


Peter Hobbs

FIELD OF WORK:

Adjunct Professor in Department of Crop Soil Sciences, Associate Director, Academic programs of IP-CALS

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca, NY

THE STORY:

Peter has spent 30 years in South Asia since he graduated with a PhD from Cornell. He worked for two International NGO’s during this time; IRRI (International Rice Research Institute, based in Bangladesh) and CIMMYT (International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, based in Pakistan and Nepal). During this time he worked closely with the national program scientists, extension agents and farmers in South Asia to catalyze and promote improved agronomic practices for rice, wheat and other system crops that helped improve farmer incomes and livelihoods while at the same time minimizing the impacts on the environment. This required developing skills in engaging partners/stakeholders in a synergistic way so they did not perceive him as a threat or competition. In his work the term “participatory technology development and extension” was coined to describe how to ensure key stakeholders were involved in planning, experimentation and feedback and to accelerate adoption of new ideas. “If farmers do not adopt new practices, research is essentially of little use.”

Since returning to Cornell in 2002, Peter has been active in teaching several courses related to international and tropical agriculture. In 2010 he took over the responsibility for the academic programs of International Programs (IP) in CALS. He mainly works with the 80 students in the International Agriculture and Rural Development major. A key component of this major is gaining international hands-on experience about what it is like to work overseas in a different culture and economic environment. This can be short trips, longer internships and even longer programs such as Peace Corps. There is a need to incorporate a stronger service-learning component in these courses and experiences.

“After this summer, I am convinced that a fundamental rethinking of organization of natural resource management across the globe is necessary for progress to occur in the long term. Additionally, I’d like to approach this by focusing on individual families as a unit of measurement and contextualizing them within the broader scheme of global economic and environmental dynamics — an idea I perhaps started to look into this summer but ran out of time to pursue at any significant length. Ultimately, as a student of International Development and Natural Resources, you want to make yourself useful to the world, and you want to do so in an open-minded and curious, investigative way, and it’s asking and following up on questions like these that will get you there. This, to me, is why an experience like the one I had in México is as valuable as your professors tell you it is, and then some. I can already tell that the perspective and mindset that I gained from this summer will surely lead me to many interesting and exciting places in my career, and perhaps do so very soon.” — Henry Wells, IARD student who interned in Mexico 2012

THE PERSON:

Peter Hobbs is an agronomist who was born in the UK and spent his early years up to his undergraduate degree in England. After graduating in agricultural botany from Reading University, he proceeded to do graduate work at Kansas State and Cornell in the USA in crop physiology. He was then thrown into the challenges of helping farmers in South Asia improve their productivity and livelihoods through adapting their present systems of food production with some improved technologies. It soon became apparent that progress could only be made and sustained if all the stakeholders are involved and participate in planning, experimentation, evaluation and feedback of the results. The farmers had to be convinced that changes would be of benefit to them before they would adopt. Peter learned by doing and had no formal training in engaged learning and research.

He presently has a dual appointment; an academic appointment in the department of crop and soil sciences and a management appointment in IP-CALS. He mainly teaches and advises students in the IARD major. Two important components of this major are area study courses for India and Latin America that have attached short trips to these regions; and, identifying suitable international experience programs for students to meet the requirement of at least two months of experience overseas in order to graduate

Faculty profile: css.cals.cornell.edu/cals/css/people/faculty.cfm?netId=ph14

THE STRATEGY:

  • Become more aware of the engaged learning pedagogy and literature as it relates to international development
  • Incorporate this pedagogy in the two area study courses and longer term international experiences above
  • Better define the learning outcomes for these courses and experiences
  • Incorporate the multidisciplinary service learning courses developed by Engaged Cornell staff into the curriculum of the IARD major
  • Improve the before and after assessments of student learning in the courses and international experiences
  • Work with the host organizations providing the international experiences to incorporate a stronger service learning pedagogy in their programs

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE:

Peter will use the time with the faculty fellows program to develop new ideas for improving the course mentioned above and develop more collaborative programs with other programs run by the faculty fellows.  For example, the Cornell program in Nepal.

 “As a Faculty Fellow, I would like to improve the quality of experiences our IARD and other Cornell students obtain when they travel and study overseas.”

LEARN MORE:

Other links: ip.cals.cornell.edu/undergrad/experiences.cfm


Christine Leuenberger

FIELD OF WORK:

Senior Lecturer, Department of Science & Technology Studies

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca NY, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi

THE STORY:

As a Fulbright Specialist since 2011, Christine had assignments to Israel and the Palestinian Territories. It is through those experiences that she learned to appreciate the value of education and cultural exchange as a way to enhance cultural appreciation and understanding. As a Faculty Fellow, Christine’s intention is to help create opportunities to link some of the most rural communities in Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo to the engaged community of scholars and students at Cornell University. The aim of this project entails three aspects: co-developing a source on ‘Sustainable Land Management, Reconciliation and Peace-building in Conflict Regions: The Case of Eastern Africa’s Great Lakes Region’ (with Dr. Lazare Sebitereko Rukundwa, National Director of Florestra Burundi, and chairman of Eben-Ezer University of Minembwe in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo; establishing research links between Cornell University, Floresta Burundi, and Eben-Ezer University of Minembwe so as to provide the basis for future collaborative research and publication projects; and set up the possibility for student exchange between these three institutions. The general goals entail: enhancing links between various academics, stakeholders, and students in Burundi, Congo, and at Cornell University; for academics and stakeholders to co-develop conceptual and hands-on tools to establish better governance as well as enhance prospects for peace and reconciliation in post-conflict regions; and provide a platform for cultural exchange and hereby enhance cross-cultural appreciation and understanding.

THE PERSON:

Christine Leuenberger is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Science & Technology Studies at Cornell University. She received a PhD in Sociology/Social Sciences in 1995 from the University of Konstanz (Germany) and an MA in Sociology of Contemporary Culture from the University of York (England). She was a Fulbright Scholar in Israel and the Palestinian Territories in 2008 and a Fulbright Specialist since 2011. She is a current recipient of a National Science Foundation Scholar’s award to investigate the history and sociology of mapping practices in Israel and Palestine. She is also working on the social impact of the West Bank Barrier and on the history and sociology of the human sciences in the Middle East. As a Faculty Fellow, she is working on developing a course on peace building and reconciliation in the Democratic Republic of Congo. She has also served as academic advisor on capacity-building projects for UNWRA (Jerusalem) and as a guest lecturer in Palestinian universities for the US Consulate General in Jerusalem.

THE STRATEGY:

  • Work with local stakeholders in order to improve policies on the ground so as to provide the economic, political and social basis for a sustainable peace in the region
  • Some of the local stakeholders involved are students (they are themselves teachers, pastors, leaders of women groups, and local chiefs).
  • As the university works closely with churches, NGOs and local political administrators the academic knowledge produced and disseminated will be immediately applied in the local context
  • Include empowering local stakeholders in terms of making decisions that would lead to more equitable land use, and thus provide the economic basis for a more harmonious co-existence between social and ethnic groups

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE:

This project started off with the co-development of a course and aims to ultimately provide a forum for student exchange between Cornell and these institutions. Floresta Burundi has hosted students in the past from Hebrew University Jerusalem as well as from other universities from Burundi, Rwanda, and Congo and thus has the facilities to host Cornell students. Such an undertaking would be the very first international collaborative research and learning project in this region and would link rural communities in Africa to the engaged community of scholars and students at Cornell.

LEARN MORE:

Selected Links to Cornell Chronicle:

Cornell Chronicle, “Leuenberger engages Palestinians“, Dec 5, 2013

Cornell Chronicle, “Leuenberger leaps genre barriers“, Sep 12, 2013

Cornell Chronicle Online, “Leuenberger to study Israel/Palestine map wars“, May 2012

Cornell Chronicle Online, “Christine Leuenberger to develop interactive course in Israel“, Oct 2011


Kathryn S. March

FIELD OF WORK:

Professor, Anthropology, Feminist/Gender/Sexuality Studies, and Public Affairs

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca, NY and various sites in Nepal

THE STORY:

The Cornell-Nepal Study Program (CNSP) is a joint program established in 1993 by Cornell University and Tribhuvan University—the national university of Nepal—and administered by Cornell Abroad.  Students coming both through Cornell Abroad and Tribhuvan work with faculty from both universities to prepare for and undertake field research projects and/or internships on topics in the sciences, engineering, humanities, arts, and social sciences in Nepal.  The semester or year program is located in the medieval town of Kirtipur, on the edge of the Kathmandu Valley and adjacent to the national Tribhuvan University campus.  Students live and eat in Nepali-style residences with Nepali roommates who are also students at the University and in the Program.  US-side students are both undergraduate and graduate students; Nepal-side students are all master’s-level.  The Program Houses sponsor a variety of enrichment and social activities, including cultural exchange nights, films, dance and yoga classes, local excursions and host family placements. Each semester of work culminates in 4 weeks of full time field research or internship.  Students have done research projects and internships in many disciplines on a wide variety of topics including (to name only a few):

  • Microcredit
  • Midwifery
  • Solar electrification
  • Photography
  • Buddhist pedagogy
  • Children in prisons
  • Human and sex trafficking
  • Religion
  • Herbal medicine
  • Air and water pollution
  • Ethnoarchaeology
  • Vernacular architecture
  • Family planning
  • Animal husbandry
  • Agriculture
  • Natural resource management
  • Human rights
  • Child labor
  • Bhutanese and Tibetan refugees
  • Political change & democratization

 

I wish that there had been programs like these available when I was a student.  When I began working in Nepal in 1973, it was very different—in many ways—but especially in the possibilities for meaningful collaborative work with Nepalese counterparts and peers.  Seeing the growth and transformation among, as well as the outstanding work by, the nearly 200 Nepalese and 200 American students who have been involved in CNSP to date has been one of the most rewarding aspects of my career.

THE PERSON:

Kathryn S. March is Professor of Anthropology, Feminist/Gender/Sexuality Studies, and Public Affairs at Cornell University.  She has worked and lived with indigenous Tibeto-origin peoples in the Himalayas, such as the Sherpa and Tamang, on questions of gender and social change, since 1973.  Her work includes a study about the empowerment and mobilization of women, Women’s informal associations: catalysts for change? (with R. Taqqu, 1985), and women’s life history narratives and song compositions, Words and worlds of Tamang women from central highland Nepal (2002).  Twice a Fulbright Scholar to Nepal (1993 & 2005-6), her work has been supported by the National Science Foundation; the National Institute of Mental Health; the Woodrow Wilson, Mellon, and Fulbright Foundations; the National Endowment for the Humanities; and the Bunting Institute.  She has worked with various Nepal government ministries including, in 2005, a consultation for the National Planning Commission on gender management systems.  Her current research focuses on the ethnohistorical construction of Tamang gender, including property rights, compulsory labor, domestic organization and wage labor migration.

THE STRATEGY:

  • Establish, develop and maintain mutually beneficial collaborative relationships between Cornell and Nepal at multiple levels—from the national to the local—and in various institutions—including government, academy, village council & households
  • Generate and operate activities with the input of all these stakeholders in ways that focus equally upon specific research and/or project outputs and, as well, upon generalized capacity building, both individual and institutional
  • Train and support student and peer involvement from both Nepal and Cornell in a wide range of disciplines.
  • Provide opportunities for scholarly and practitioner exchange among Cornell and Tribhuvan colleagues, as well as with local community members.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE:

The CNSP is now trying to expand to begin offering two even more exclusively “engaged learning” summer programs:  (1) a village- home-stay based undergraduate program for students with project opportunities developed in collaboration with the community in organic farming & marketing, environmental degradation mitigation, eco-tourism, and teaching (including a community health education initiative); and (2) a Kathmandu-valley based professional masters’ program of institutional internship placements.  Both programs would be 10 weeks and involve not only hands-on work but also guided service learning components.

 “As a Faculty Fellow, I look forward to learning how to support the co-curricular goals of engaged and service learning as better integrated and self-conscious components of the CNSP international experience, for both its Cornell and Nepalese participants.”

LEARN MORE:

For an informational presentation about all the Cornell Nepal Study Programs 2014 please click here.

For application information about the semester or year programs in Nepal please click here.

For information about the professional master’s summer internship program in Nepal please click here.

For information about the undergraduate summer field and service learning program in Nepal please click here.

For information about anthropology at Cornell please click here.

For information about feminist, gender and sexuality studies at Cornell please click here.

For information about the Cornell Institute of Public Affairs please click here.

For information about Summer Nepali at Cornell please click here.

For information about the Digital Himalaya Project please click here.

For information about the Tamang Historical Document archive please click here.


Heidi Mouillesseaux-Kunzman

FIELD OF WORK:

Community and Regional Development Institute, Department of Development Sociology

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

New York State

THE STORY:

As the Coordinator of the new CALS NYS Internship Program, Heidi has been fortunate to have learned a lot about program development and implementation from existing Cornell internship programs. In this process, it has become clear that (1) there are a number of these opportunities hosted by Cornell that are providing students with career and life-related experiences; (2) the structure and goals of these programs are diverse, with an array of types that could be defined as “community-engaged internship programs”; (3) despite structural and programmatic differences, these programs have similar goals, pedagogical methods, logistical necessities, and challenges/opportunities; (4) better understanding these similarities and differences offers an excellent opportunity to strengthen both individual internship programs (established and emerging) and the collective Cornell University internship experience.

Heidi’s goal, as a Facutly Fellowis to work with other Cornell internship programs to: (1) identify and characterize the spectrum of community-engaged internship programs at Cornell; (2) identify the shared and distinct components of these programs, including, but not limited to, opportunities and challenges; (3) if there is interest, establish a forum for supporting shared learning, peer support, and collaboration among these programs; and (4) learn and share best practices for community engagement.

THE PERSON:

Heidi is Senior Extension Associate with the Community and Regional Development Institute (CaRDI) in the Department of Development Sociology at Cornell University. She develops educational programs and tools, facilitates regional networking opportunities, and conducts research designed to help local officials, community and economic developers, and other local leaders to collaboratively identify, pursue, and achieve their community’s development goals. Heidi’s current projects include the CALS NYS Internship Program, an initiative designed to connect employers and communities with exceptional and motivated Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences students seeking opportunities to explore careers and contribute to New York communities; support for agriculture and food systems extension professionals; the development of an evaluation plan for Cornell Cooperative Extension’s community and economic vitality program area; understanding how NYS agencies which fund sewer and water infrastructure are implementing the Smart Growth Public Policy Infrastructure Act; and the ongoing development of a national community of practice designed to support rural communities (Extension’s Enhancing Rural Communities CoP).


Ananda Suarez

FIELD OF WORK:

Assistant Professor, History of Art

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca and East Harlem, NY

THE STORY:

With our support, Ananda Cohen Suarez developed a new course with her colleague, Ella Diaz, dedicated to researching and documenting the historic murals of East Harlem, commonly known as “El Barrio.” These vibrant mural paintings, which adorn the walls of tenement buildings and shops, honor the lives, losses, and histories of the neighborhood’s predominantly Latino/a community.  The murals remain poorly documented and face the risk of removal as encroaching development and gentrification continue to alter East Harlem’s urban environment.

This project enables students to research the images from an art historical and literary perspective, linking them with broader artistic, cultural, and political movements in the 1960s-1990s, when the majority of the mural was created. Students would participate in art and preservation in action. Art history and literary studies will be utilized as powerful agents of community development and dialogue, enabling students to recognize the potential for the humanities to work outside the classroom toward tangible outcomes. The students will collaborate with community partners in New York City and conduct interviews with some of the muralists.

The project culminated in both a student-curated show of photographs taken during their trip to East Harlem at Rockefeller Hall as well as the development of an interactive digital archive of the murals and the research carried out on them. With this critical groundwork laid for the study and appreciation of East Harlem’s important artistic patrimony, Ananda hopes to expand this project to other neighborhoods, particularly the Lower East Side and the South Bronx. With further knowledge and recognition comes institutional support. Ultimately, Ananda hopes that these initiatives will make a strong case for their continued preservation so that the murals can continue to remain a source of pride and markers of history for their communities.

THE PERSON:

Ananda Cohen Suarez is an Assistant Professor of History of Art. Her research centers on the pre-Columbian and colonial Andes, with a particular emphasis on the relationships between visual culture and colonialism, art and agency, and the fashioning of indigenous identities. She is the co-author of Guide to Life in the Inca World (Facts on File, 2011), and has published articles in a number of journals, including Colonial Latin American Review, Ethnohistory, and Allpanchis. She is currently preparing a book-length manuscript based out of her doctoral research provisionally titled Local Cosmopolitanism: Mural Paintings and Social Meaning in Colonial Peru. She teaches courses on Latin American art, from specialized seminars on the Andes to broad surveys of pre-Columbian and colonial art. She is particularly interested in the legacies of the pre-Columbian and colonial past in contemporary artistic practice, which heavily informed the design of “Visualizing El Barrio” as a course that integrates these new research interests with innovative pedagogical practices.

Faculty Profile: arthistory.cornell.edu/people/cohen.cfm

THE STRATEGY:

  • Collaborate with Ella Diaz on the major themes, methodologies, and theoretical framework of this collaborative service learning course
  • Communicate with potential partners in East Harlem, including community members, mural artists, activists, and non-profit organizations
  • Develop partnerships with key institutions dedicated to archiving East Harlem history and its urban environment
  • Provide students with the necessary training in art historical, literary, ethnographic, and site-based research methods through a “trial run” of visiting and researching historic murals in the Ithaca region, with assistance from the Johnson Museum of Art
  • Conduct a field trip to New York City, where students will choose a mural to research and document and meet with relevant community members
  • Facilitate a student-curated exhibition of their field photographs at the Latino Studies Program in Rockefeller Hall in December 2014
  • Develop a public digital archive of the East Harlem murals that integrates the students’ research and photographs, along with testimony from residents and artists.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE:

Ananda would like to expand this project to other prominent neighborhoods with historic mural traditions in need of documentation, including the South Bronx and the Lower East side. Through this work, she hopes to increase the visibility of these murals as integral components of New York City’s urban history and advocate for their preservation.


Rana Zadeh

FIELD OF WORK:

Assistant Professor, Department of Design and Environmental Analysis

FELLOWSHIP LOCATION:

Ithaca, NY

THE STORY:

During 2014, Rana taught three courses — Innovations in Healthcare Research, Policy meets Design, and Planning and Managing the Workplace — all of which involved community-based research and design activities. During the fellowship year, her plan was to focus on the successful integration of the service learning model into the course Planning and Managing the Workplace, which she taught for the first time in 2014. In the service learning project launched by this course, Cornell students partnered with HKS Architects and the Center for Advanced Design Research & Evaluation (CADRE), two national leaders in workplace design, to generate innovative design solutions and integrate cutting-edge research into the design of a community health facility. This fruitful collaboration has continued until 2016. More information on class activities can be found at blogs.cornell.edu/dea3530fall2014/ and www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/11/new-course-blends-health-policy-and-facility-design. The graduate class Innovations in Healthcare Research has launched the Healthcare Innovation series. For the year 2015, we partnered with New York Presbyterian hospital to rethink the future of neurological intensive care unit.

THE PERSON:

Dr. Zadeh’s interest includes healthcare design, evidence-based design and the translation and application of scientifically tested research about design innovation into real-life policy and practice to achieve the best possible health, safety, quality, and efficiency outcomes via systems approach. Dr. Zadeh’s team is currently working on several projects. One primary focus is the development of non-pharmacological system solutions to improve quality of life and manage symptoms for patients with advanced and chronic illnesses, particularly in end-of-life, geriatric, and acute care settings. Other projects include the development of novel technological, environmental, and educational interventions to improve sleep and circadian rhythms for bedbound patients; the economic evaluation of improvements in care environments; and research into how workplace design can improve alertness, productivity, efficiency, and patient satisfaction. Zadeh’s team is the recipient of the Novel Technology Award from the Clinical and Translational Science Center and Weill Cornell Medical College. Zadeh has also received the Center for Health Design’s 2012-13 New Investigator Award for high-quality research in the field of evidence-based healthcare facility design and the 2013 Architectural Research Centers Consortium King Medal for innovation, integrity, and scholarship in environmental design research.

THE STRATEGY:

  • Emphasize the development and improvement of multidisciplinary dialogue among design, research, policy, and practice.
  • Involve Cornell students from the fields of design, architecture, interior design, urban and regional planning, business administration, policy analysis and management, public health, global health, landscape architecture, information science, facility management, ergonomics, environmental psychology, medicine, premedical studies, and biology and society.
  • Obtain the knowledge and experience related to human-centered scientific and applied research on design creativity
  • Make a difference in the world by working on real life projects presented by clients and community members
  • Practice to embrace diverse perspectives from multiple angles
  • Improve awareness about the sophistication and sensitivity of healthcare environments and the ethics and values needed to engage with patients, leaders, residents, and other stakeholders.